Cover Crops

Cover Crops

  • Annual Ryegrass
  • Barley, Hays
  • Buckwheat
  • Chickling Vetch
  • Common Vetch
  • Clover, Berseem
  • Clover, Crimson
  • Clover, Kura
  • Clover, Red
  • Clover, White Ladino
  • Corn
  • Cowpea
  • Flax
  • Hairy Vetch
  • Faba Bean (Horse Bean)
  • Italian Ryegrass
  • Kale
  • Lentil
  • Medic
  • Milo
  • Millet, German
  • Millet , Japanese
  • Millet, Pearl
  • Millet, Siberian
  • Millet, White Proso
  • Mustard
  • Oat
  • Pea
  • Phacelia
  • Piper Sudan Grass
  • Radish
  • Rapeseed (Canola)
  • Rapeseed, Winter
  • Red Beet
  • Rye, Spring
  • Rye, Winter
  • Safflower
  • Sorghum
  • Sorghum Sudan
  • Sorghum Sudan (BMR)
  • Soybean
  • Subterranean Clover
  • Sugarbeet
  • Sunflower
  • Sunn Hemp
  • Teff Grass
  • Triticale, Spring
  • Triticale, Winter
  • Turnip, Barkant
  • Turnip, Psaja
  • Turnip, Purple Top
  • Forage Winter Wheat

Millets

German Millet (20 lbs per acre)

German Millet is a warm season annual grass and is best if seeded after soil temperatures reach at least 65 degrees. Maturity can be expected in 60 to 70 days and it should be harvested before the plant passes the boot stage. German Millet is highly palatable, has a much thinner stalk than Pearl Millet and can produce up to 3.5 tons of forage per acre under good conditions. It tolerates drought and saline and will grow in a wide variety of soil conditions although it does not perform well in cold or overly wet conditions. German Millet does not regrow after the initial cutting and it can produce nitrates when under drought stress.

Pearl Millet (20 lbs per acre)

Pearl Millet is a warm season annual grass and establishes best if seeded after soil temperatures reach at least 65 degrees. Maturity can be expected in 60 to70 days and it should be harvested before the plant passes the boot stage. Peal Millet is highly productive and has produced as much as 9,000 lbs. of forage per acre. However, it has woodier stems than forage sorghum making hay production difficult unless it is chopped. It does tolerate drought well and will grow in a wide variety of soil conditions, but does not perform well in cold or overly wet conditions.

Pearl Millet does not regrow after the initial cutting and because of the large amount of biomass it produces it is often used as a cover crop to create organic matter. Pearl Millet is also known to have twice the incidence of nitrates that other millets do.

Japanese Millet (20 lbs per acre)

Japanese Millet is an annual warm season grass that prefers cooler climates wetter soils than most other annual summer crops. It establishes best if seeded after soil temperatures reach 65 degrees and maturity can be expected in about 60 days. Like other millets, if harvested it should be done before the plant passes the boot stage. Feed quality is good and it is often found along rivers and ponds making it a variety often used to attract waterfowl. It has been known to produce as much as 1.75 tons of forage per acre and although it prefers cooler growing conditions it does not tolerate frost.

Proso Millet (20 lbs per acre)

Proso Millets are warm season annual grasses that establish best if seeded after soil temperatures reach at least 65 degrees, maturity is reached between 60 and 70 days after planting. Proso Millets are commonly known as seed millets, often used in production of bird seed. Because of this, they typically produce less forage, only about 1.25 tons per acre in good conditions. Proso Millets are adapted to many soil types and are very drought tolerant, and like other Millets they do not provide re-growth after cutting. Red Proso Millet contains higher levels of tannins than, and are therefore less palatable White Proso Millet.

Siberian Millet (20 lbs per acre)

Siberian Millet is a warm season annual grass and is best if seeded after soil temperatures reach at least 65 degrees. Maturity can be expected in 55 to 60 days and it should be harvested before the plant passes the boot stage. Siberian Millet is highly palatable, has a much thinner stalk than Pearl Millet and a thinner stalk than German Millet, and can produce up to 3.0 tons of forage per acre under good conditions. It tolerates drought and saline and will grow in a wide variety of soil conditions although it does not perform well in cold or overly wet conditions. Siberian Millet does not regrow after the initial cutting and it can produce nitrates when under drought stress.


Sorghums

Forage Sorghum (5 to 10 lbs per acre)

Forage Sorghum is an annual warm season grass and establishes best if seeded after soil temperatures exceed 65 degrees. Maturity can be expected in 60 to 70 days and it best if it is harvested before it reaches the boot stage. It is very productive and drought tolerant, producing up to 9 tons of forage per acre in North Dakota trials. It is a single growth crop, little or no regrowth occurs after the first harvest. Forage Sorghum is known to be very stalky and does not dry down well, therefore it is recommended only for use when being chopped. Forage Sorghum can produce high levels of prussic acid so harvest should occur before frost.

Sorghum Sudan Grass (20 to 30 lbs per acre)

Sorghum Sudan Grass is a hybrid plant cross of Forage Sorghum and Sudan Grass. It is an annual warm season grass and should be planted after soil temperatures reach at least 65 degrees. Sorghum Sudan Grass is very drought tolerant and does provide regrowth after the initial cutting, it has produced as much as 8 tons of forage per acre in North Dakota trials. Sorghum Sudan Grass has thick stalks making it difficult to dry down for baling. It is best suited to chopping but can be baled if managed correctly.

Sorghum Sudan Grass has a maturity of 65-70 days and should be harvested when it reached 48 inches in height or while it is in the boot stage. Sorghum Sudan Grass does have some risk of Prussic Acid poisoning so it is best to be harvested before frost.

BMR Sorghum Sudan Grass (20 to 30 lbs per acre)

BMR Sorghum Sudan Grass is a hybrid plant cross of Forage Sorghum and Sudan Grass. BMR stands for brown mid rib, meaning it has a brown streak running through the center of the leaf. BMR Sorghum Sudan is a sweeter variety of Sorghum Sudan Grass making it more palatable to livestock, producers have claimed that the sweetness reduces waste. The additional sugars in BMR Sorghum Sudan Grass also give it about 5% more feed energy than Conventional Sorghum Sudan Grass.

It is an annual warm season grass and should be planted after soil temperatures reach at least 65 degrees. BMR Sorghum Sudan Grass is very drought tolerant and does provide regrowth after the initial cutting, it is a little less productive than Conventional Sorghum Sudan Grass, it has produced as much as 7-8 tons of forage per acre in North Dakota trials. Sorghum Sudan Grass has thick stalks making it difficult to dry down for baling. It is best suited to chopping but can be baled if managed correctly.

Sorghum Sudan Grass has a maturity of 65-70 days and should be harvested when it reached 48 inches in height or while it is in the boot stage. Sorghum Sudan Grass does have some risk of Prussic Acid poisoning so it is best to be harvested before frost.</p?

Sudan Grass (10 to 20 lbs per acre)

Sudan Grass is a very drought tolerant, productive warm season crop. It is best planted when soil temperatures reach at least 65 degrees. Sudan Grass does regrow after the initial cutting and in field trials in ND it has produced about 7 tons of forage per acre.

Like other warm season grasses Sudan Grass has a 60 to 70 day maturity and should be cut when the heads are in the milk dough stage or earlier. Sudan Grass is noted for having a thinner stalk and narrower leaves than Sorghums and Sorghum Sudan Grass hybrids, therefore it dries down much easier and is much more suited to baling. Sudan Grass is also known to produce only about half the prussic acid that Sorghum varieties produce. Regardless, care should be taken not to harvest within 7 days after frost.


Mixes

Pea/Forage Blends

60% Pea / 40% Forage Oats
70% Pea / 30% Forage Oats
60% Pea / 40% Forage Barley
60% Pea / 40% Triticale
Pea/Oat and Pea/Barley Blends seeded at 100lbs per acre. Pea/Triticale Blends seeded at 110lbs per acre.

Hay/Grazing Mix Cover Crop

19% Forage Oats
10% Forage Peas
9% German Millet
12.5% Radish
12.5% Turnip
10% Canola
12% BMR Sorghum Sudan
15% Berseem Clover

This mix was designed to maximize tonnage, palatability, and overall soil health. These Species help to add and scavenge nitrogen, increase organic matter, filter water and break up compacted soils.

Salt Tolerant Cover Crop

50% Forage Barley
12.5% Sugarbeet
10% Canola
17.5% Pipe Sudangrass
10% Sunflower
This mix was designed to help utilize and “dry out” those wet areas that have developed salt. Although the primary use is to rehabilitate salty soil, all species also produce good forage.

Soil Improver Crop

12.5% Berseem Clover
16% Forage Turnip
12.5% Forage Radish
14% German Millet
5% Forage Oats
5% Lentil
10% Forage Pea
10% Soybeans
10% Sunflower
5% Common Vetch
Although this mix is primarily designed to improve soil health, all of the species in this mix will make fair to good feed as well. All species combined will help to reduce erosion, capture soil nutrients, suppress weeds, and reduce soil compaction.

Late Season Mix

8.3% Kale
11.2% Radish
11.2% Barkant Turnip
69.3% Lentil
This mix is designed to produce high quality forage while adding nitrogen to your soil. All species tolerate frost well so they should provide some good growth later in the year .

Chesak Seed House

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2320 East Thayer Ave, Bismarck, ND 58501

Call: 701-223-0391
Fax: 701-223-0980

Email:
Info@chesakseedhouse.com
Derek@chesakseedhouse.com
Randi@chesakseedhouse.com

Seasonal Hours

December – February
Monday thru Friday 9:00 to 5:00

March
Monday thru Friday 8:00 to 5:00

April – May
Monday thru Friday 8:00 to 5:00
Saturdays 8:00 to 12:00.

June – November
Monday thru Friday 8:00 to 5:00.

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